Dutch Community

powered by Holland at Home

Weird and wonderful Dutch houses

Those who were born and bred in the Netherlands will no doubt be highly familiar with the much loved Dutch children’s song ‘In Holland Staat Een Huis’ (there is a house in Holland). But what exactly does a typical Dutch house look like? Below is a brief overview of some of the more weird and wonderful buildings that the Dutch like to call home.

Woonboot (Houseboat)

Dry land is relatively scarce in the Netherlands, which is why so many Dutch people choose to live on the water. According to Amsterdam council records, houseboats were already in use as far back as the 17th century. Indeed, even outside the capital, houseboats have been popular for centuries. Today the most famous Dutch houseboats are the ‘poezenboot’ (a shelter for stray cats) and the Botel (a houseboat hotel) in Amsterdam, and the ‘bajesboten’ (boat prisons, which are no longer in use) in Rotterdam, Dordrecht and Zaanstad.

Windmolen (Windmills)

Dutch windmillsMillers and their families have been living in Dutch windmills ever since they were first introduced to the country in the twelfth century. Even today many are still inhabited either by their owners or managers, although most simply serve as a museum or Dutch visitor attraction.

Vuurtoren (Lighthouses)

In the past, operational lighthouses in the Netherlands were commonly occupied by the lighthouse keeper and his family, however these days most are fully automated and occupancy is no longer required. Yet, decommissioned lighthouses still remain a sought-after choice of Dutch home, particularly as they tend to boast incredible views and stunning architecture!

Stolpboerderij (Dutch farmhouse)

The stolpboerderij, a square shaped farm with a pyramidal roof, is predominantly found in the Dutch province of Noord-Holland. This unique style of Dutch farmhouse has been built ever since the 17th century and, in addition to accommodating both the farmer and his family, also provided shelter for livestock and storage for tools and hay.

Trapgevel (Stepped gable house)

A trapgevel is a typical town house with a roof that features a ‘stair-step’ design. Although the trapgevel can also be found in Belgium, France, Germany and England, it has proved most popular in Holland. The majority of trapgevels in the Netherlands were built during the 17th century, fine examples of which can be seen in almost every major Dutch city.

In Holland Staat Een Huis

Never heard the celebrated Dutch children’s song ‘In Holland Staat Een Huis’? The lyrics (detailed below) are extremely easy to learn and the melody is available on YouTube.

In Holland staat een huis

In Holland staat een huis

In Holland staat een huis ja ja

Van je tingele tingela hop sa sa

In Holland staat een huis

In Holland staat een huis

In dat huis daar woont een man

In dat huis daar woont een man

In dat huis daar woont een man ja ja

Van je tingele tingela hop sa sa

In dat huis daar woont een man

In dat huis daar woont een man

En die man die kiest een vrouw

En die man die kiest een vrouw

En die man die kiest een vrouw ja ja

Van je tingele tingela hop sa sa

En die man die kiest een vrouw

En die man die kiest een vrouw

En die vrouw die kiest een kind

En die vrouw die kiest een kind

En die vrouw die kiest een kind ja ja

Van je tingele tingela hop sa sa

En die vrouw die kiest een kind

En die vrouw die kiest een kind

For more Dutch children’s songs why not peruse our article entitled Children’s songs from the Netherlands?

Prefer to read this article in Dutch? Then why not visit our sister blog, Heimwee.info, specifically intended for Dutch emigrants abroad?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: